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Chemical Brain Injury
by Kaye H. Kilburn

"Chemicals have injured human brains in the United States in many people who are not aware that they have been chemically exposed. Unless this pandemic is stopped, it threatens our existence.

"So alleges Kaye H. Kilburn, MD, in this scholarly treatise. To prove his hypotheses, he argues....: at industrial sites (and becoming progressively ubiquitous in our environment) neurotoxins are released.....[which] are inhaled and absorbed into the blood, and traverse or bypass the blood-brain barrier....

"Initially, I was skeptical of Kilburn's means of demonstrating neurologic dysfunction....[but] As part of litigation...independent of Dr. Kilburn, our center assessed olfactory function and performed classic [examinations] on several hundred of the same patients he assessed at five exposure sites; exposures had been to a multitude of toxins including arsenic, chlordane, polychlorinated biphenyls, trichlorethylene, and toluene. Although [our methods were] markedly different from the modalities of Dr Kilburn, our diagnoses generally concurred.

"...Kilburn [has a] disdain for psychiatry and psychiatric diagnoses. He suggests....posttraumatic stress disorder and somatization disorder are frequently misdiagnoses of chemical toxicity. He concludes that the diagnosis of a psychiatric illness is a denial mechanism, preventing the recognition of the true disorder: chemical toxicity.

"...for those interested in environmental illness and neurotoxicity, I highly recommend this exposition on a potentially 'hidden pandemic'." 
 

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Most recent revision Wednesday, September 11, 2002